Quebec City: What a Food City! (Vegetarian Style)

Quebec City blew us away with amazing vegetarian food options. See, in the past, we’ve had trouble finding vegetarian fare in some of places that we’ve travelled. For Quebec City, I researched and made reservations weeks before we left to avoid the last minute scramble to find grub (trying to find food when you’re really hungry is such a pain). The verdict?: Quebec City is one of the top food cities of my life! Some food highlights of our trip include:

Chez Rioux & Pettigrew: This place was close to our hotel and absolutely adorable. The atmosphere had a really cool “farm-to-table” rustic vibe. The butternut squash soup was amazing. The grains/veggie ball dish with date puree was also incredible!

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How adorable is Chez Rioux & Pettigrew?
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The date puree in this dish was amazing! I immediately wanted to learn to make this at home.

La Planque: This restaurant was a bit further from our hotel (we ended up taking a taxi). We were lucky enough to sit in the back with a full view of the kitchen, so we had a fun time watching the chefs at work. We told the waiter that we were vegetarian and they ended up making us a customized meal!

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Our delicious customized meal at La Planque.

Le Clocher Penché: An excellent brunch place that we found during our walk through St. Roch. We got the vegetarian plate (onion banjos, orange yogurt, crispy endive, squash pickle, and cashew) and the soup of the day – a root vegetable soup.

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Root vegetable soup at Le Clocher Penché.

My favorite restaurant of the trip was probably Légende, which was a short walk from our hotel. This restaurant was fantastic. We were told that they used all locally sourced products for their dishes. The ambience was awesome – the restaurant was dimly lit with cute string lights. We sat next to the windows watching the snow fall. We had the homemade tofu and vegetable forest (mustard vinaigrette, black garlic crumble, with enoki and chanterelle mushrooms), cricket handmade pasta (kale, oyster mushrooms, and vegetable jus), and the ricotta and flax seed cavatelli (mushroom, pangrattato, eggplant puree, and 1608 cheese). For dessert, I opted for the sea buckthorn curd, because I rarely see sea buckthorn on menus!

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Sea buckthorn curd dessert

As far as disappointing dining experiences, we had dinner one evening at Aux Anciens Canadiens. The restaurant is charming inside with its old world vibe, but the food was bland and not particularly memorable. We were later told that this restaurant mostly catered to tour groups. We were excited to try the maple syrup pie (I had even made my own from recipes online in anticipation for this trip). My pie was better, which I guess is a good thing since that means I don’t necessarily need to rush back to Aux Anciens Canadiens to get my fill.

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Copenhagen Day Four: Torvehallerne and Gardens (Part I)

Our fourth day in Denmark was quite busy! I’ll have to break it into two separate chunks – the first focusing on the initial half of our day at Torvehallerne and the city’s botanical gardens. 🙂

We started off the morning at Torvehallerne, a market with numerous high-end food stands – which patrons can enjoy either on the premises or as regular grocery shopping to bring home! Torvehallerne had a very modern, clean, and bright vibe (and why wouldn’t it? It’s surrounded by glass)! Bonus for us? Since we visited during the late morning on a weekday, the market was practically empty. Don’t you love this herb stand?

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Herb stand at Torvehallerne

We toured around the stands, drooling over the options, before settling on the spicy fried egg Bánh mì. Yum! You’ll enjoy this if you love eggs and a lot of cilantro. Finding vegetarian fare wasn’t exactly easy in Copenhagen, so we were happy to stumble across this.

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Spicy fried egg Bánh mì, yum!

From Torvehallerne, we walked over to the University of Copenhagen’s Botanical Gardens. The gardens were free to enter. The campus had nice outdoor gardens and ponds, along with beautiful historic glass greenhouses. I was surprised at the sheer variety of plants growing outdoors; they were labeled with their native habitats and there were plants from pretty much every continent happily growing outdoors. I’m jealous of the staff’s green thumbs, because I can barely keep an aloe plant alive. 🙂

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Botanical Garden glasshouse and the famous Palm House. 🙂

The narrow stairs in the Palm House are a little scary, especially considering the humidity in the room. I couldn’t take very many good photos, because the lens on my camera kept fogging up. We especially enjoyed the moss displays. I kept hunting around the gardens trying to find all of the poisonous plants, which all have signs outlining the hazards!